I love Seth Godin and many of his ideas and thoughts. His book, Purple Cow is a marketing classic for anyone needing inspiration for small businesses on a low or non-existent budget. Currently, I’m reading another great little book of his called All Marketers Are Liars (Tell Stories) and in it, I found a brilliant little lesson.

Seth Godin

He talks about looking for a difference and explains how the bullfrog which has a brain that weighs about twenty four grammes, (compared to a human brain which weighs about sixty times as much) can do something humans can never do. That is of course, catch flies all day long. We humans simply cannot do this – with or without our tongue.

It turns out that a frog’s brain is programmed to do one thing and one thing only – watch the sky for moving bugs. It ignores the static environment so much that even if it was surrounded by dead bugs and nothing was moving across the air, it would starve to death.

Godin contends that humans do in fact, use the same strategy – albeit not in the area of catching flies. More like in the area of dealing with all the data that comes our way non-stop, 24/7.

He gives one example that I could truly relate to and that is whenever you catch your car odometer and it’s about to change from say, 29,999 to 30,000 miles. I used to love watching that happen (cautiously of course, if I was on a motorway or any other road for that matter!) It gave me a certain sense of achievement for no other reason than I had witnessed a significant change, a record of how far I had travelled in that particular car.

What do you notice that is different and catches your attention without you even thinking about it?

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Paul Hatcher

I am at heart, a communicator. I love to use words, whether written or spoken and maximise those words to hopefully, bring some encouragement - literally, to put courage into the hearts & minds of those who read or hear them. In my work as an executive coach, speaker, workshop facilitator, I love also to listen...deeply, and then respond with some encouragement.